Sean Dyche

Dyche, a holder of the UEFA Pro License, entered football management for the first time following his appointment with Watford in June 2011.

Sean began his coaching career with Watford, having served as a youth team coach before he became assistant manager to Malky Mackay. He also spent three seasons with the Hornets towards the end of his playing career and was club captain.

After two successful seasons in the Championship, Mackay was then approached to become the new manager of Cardiff City in June 2011. After accepting the role, Watford moved quickly to make Dyche their new manager.

He went on to enjoy a successful first season in charge at Vicarage Road, as Watford finished 11th in the npower Championship, their highest league finish since 2007/08. He was also shortlisted for the npower Championship Manager of the Year. Despite this success, Watford parted company with Sean in July 2012 after new owners took charge of the club.

In his first season at Turf Moor, he once again led his new side to a 11th place finish in the Championship. In 2013/14 in what was his first full season in charge, Dyche secured automatic promotion to the top flight for Burnley the first time since 1973. What was even more remarkable about his achievement was that since being appointed in October 2012 Dyche paid a transfer fee for just one player. In November 2014, Dyche was then named North West Manager of the Year.

As a player, Dyche spent the majority of his playing career with Chesterfield and captained their promotion winning team in 1995 as well as their famous FA Cup side that reached the semi-finals in 1997. Later, Dyche also achieved promotions with Millwall and Bristol City. He also represented Luton Town and Northampton Town.

Sean is a graduate of the LMA's Certificate of Applied Management.

Sessions by Sean Dyche

Turning to play forward

in Attacking, Skills and Techniques

This exclusive session from Sean Dyche aims to encourage turning to open the opportunity to play forward rather than sending the ball sideways or backwards. Within this, it allows players to put the ball ‘at risk’. MORE


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