Technical passing with movement

This session is about encouraging players to receive the ball with the back foot and developing movement through deliberate practice.

These activities are both challenging and fun and they try to develop habits that will stay with players. It’s all about being comfortable receiving the ball with the left or right foot, using good body position and developing the right touch and feel. By adding movement to the exercises, we also start to concentrate young minds on the fact that the ‘picture’ changes as the ball and players move.

It’s very much a technical practice for the individual and for small groups. I would use it a couple of times a week and would certainly return to it on a regular basis, depending on the age and proficiency of the players.

SET-UP

Area

Up to half a pitch

Equipment

Balls, bibs, cones

Number of Players

Groups of 3 players

Session time

Introduction: 15mins

Introducing movement: 15mins

Third man runs 1: 20mins

Third man runs 2: 20mins

Small-sided game: 20mins

What do I get the players to do?

Introduction

We set up with two players 10 yards apart. The ball starts with player A and both players run forward passing to each other as they are running, as shown [1]. We develop the practice by introducing one-touch play and passing with the outside foot; we switch the players regularly so they practise both left and right foot passing.

1

1. The ball starts with player A and both players run forward, passing to each other as they are running
2. Players should be accurate and not have to break stride to receive
3. Start slowly and encourage the players to pick up the tempo as they feel confident


We start slowly and encourage the players to pick up the tempo as they feel confident. Players should be accurate and not have to break stride to receive.

Introducing movement

We set up with three players 10 yards apart. Player B (the middle player) starts with the ball and passes right footed to player A, then makes an overlapping run behind player A. Player A passes one touch with his left foot to Player C who is on the run, as shown [2a], and then player A overlaps player C. Player C passes right footed to player B, as shown [2b], and the sequence continues.

2a

1. Player B (red) starts with the ball and passes right footed to player A (blue] and then makes an overlapping run behind player A
2. Player A passes first time with his left foot to player C (yellow), who receives on the run

2b

1. After passing to C, player A makes an overlapping run behind yellow player C
2. Player C passes right footed to player B and then makes an overlapping run behind player B
3. Player B makes a left footed first-time pass to player A and the sequence continues


When players receive from the right, the key technical points we want to see is players letting the ball come across their body and using their left foot to pass; and when receiving from the left, players should use their right foot.

Introducing movement

Third man runs 1

We set up with three players in a triangle shape, with each player 10 yards away from the others. The players should be using the principles and techniques from the previous practices.

Player A starts with the ball and passes right footed to player C. Player C passes one touch right footed to player B, and player B passes left footed to player A who has made the third man run, as shown [3].

3

1. Players set up in a triangle shape, with players 10 yards apart. Blue player A passes right footed to yellow player C
2. Yellow player C passes one touch right footed to red player B
3. Player B passes left footed to player A, who has made a third man run
4. To repeat, player A becomes the central player at the point of the triangle and B and C become the base of the triangle


To repeat, player A becomes the central player at the point of the triangle and B and C become the base of the triangle.

This practice must be one touch and performed with a good tempo.

Third man runs 2

Similar to the previous practice, we set up with three players in a triangle, with each player 10 yards away from the others. Players are limited to first-time passes.

Player A starts with the ball and passes right footed to player B

and makes an overlapping run  around him. Player B passes left or right footed to player C and follows the pass. Player C passes left footed into player B’s run and B makes a pass to A at the end of his third man run, as shown [4]. Repeat as previously.

4

1. Players set up in a triangle shape, with each player 10 yards apart. Blue player A passes right footed to red player B and makes an overlapping run
2. Red player B passes to yellow player C and follows the pass, receiving the ball back from C while on the run
3. Player B passes to A at the end of his overlapping run. Then repeat, as in previous practice


How would you put this in a game situation?

Small-sided game

We set up an area of 60×40 yards and play a 6v6 game [not shown], encouraging forward runs and first-time passing. We want to see players receiving the ball on their back foot, especially on their weaker side. Letting the ball come across their bodies should start to become the norm for players.

What are the key things to look out for?

We want to see players using a good body shape, receiving on the back foot and on the half turn. Players should also be comfortable with both feet and capable of passing and moving at high tempo.

We want to see good communication and players collaborating with their team mates, reading situations and understanding triggers for movement.

What are the typical mistakes players might make and how do I avoid them?

Players can pass and move too quickly, causing the practice to breakdown. To remedy this, we encourage players to perform the exercise at a slower pace until their confidence grows.

Another common mistake that we see is players making

inaccurate and erratic passes, especially using their weaker

side. To solve this problem, we get them to play with a slower tempo to encourage confidence on their  weaker foot.

Share this

Follow us